Dr Bill’s Big Fix Blog

Why our new bag makes sense for big DIY projects

Firstly – an introduction! After years of brilliant, insightful blogging, Dr. Bill has hung up his keyboard and returned to his toolshed to happily DIY to his heart’s content.

Read More

Cement +concrete specialist and enthusiast. Chartered Engineer who has worked on projects worldwide, now with Tarmac

Guest Blog

Get expert advice from your local merchants



Read what our experts at Jewson have to say.

Ask an Expert

How do I know if the wall is substandard? I have just had a wall built as part of an extension and suspect that Fairy Liquid has been used. 

1
Answers

The use of washing up liquid rather than a proper mortar plasticiser is not good practice and...

The use of washing up liquid rather than a proper mortar plasticiser is not good practice and can lead to low strength mortar (although washing up liquid bottles are sometimes used by builders to add proper plasticisers to the mixer). Try scratching the mortar joints with a metal nail, it should not rub away easily although this is not an absolute proof. Do the discarded bottles smell like they contained perfumed washing up liquid?

Please also take a look at our blog post 'All Washed Up' http://www.diycement.com/blogpost.aspx?postId=39

0 year, 7 months ago | Answered By: Emma Davis (DIY Cement Expert)

0 year, 7 months ago | Asked By: Anonymous

What cement should I use to level the floor under my garage door

1
Answers

You want a high strength cement...

You want a high strength cement that will resist abrasion and trafficking. The best option would be a Portland cement (CEM I) such as Procem. Make sure that you keep it moist for a few days after placing so that it develops its full potential strength

1 year ago | Answered By: Jack Dent (DIY Cement Expert)

1 year ago | Asked By: Anonymous

What cement should I use for concrete directly exposed to sea water?

1
Answers

Sea water does not significantly attack good quality concrete , but it can cause rusting of any...

Sea water does not significantly attack good quality concrete , but it can cause rusting of any embedded metal which may eventually crack the concrete. Concrete exposed to sea water should always have a low water/cement ratio (below 0.55), high strength (C30 or above) and must be properly cured in order to develop its full resistance to seawater penetration. A Portland-fly ash cement such as Phoenix or our Lafarge General Purpose cement is a good choice for concrete in these circumstances (look for the designation CEM II/B-V) as it get progressively more impermeable with time and has a greater chemical resistance to the chlorides present in sea water. For reinforced structural concrete seek specialist advice.

4 years, 7 months ago | Answered By: Dr Bill Price (DIY Cement Expert)

4 years, 7 months ago | Asked By: Anonymous
Next >